Stuttering or Stammering

Some persons are unable to speak fluently though their hearing and speech production are normal, which result in various forms of stuttering. Such persons tend to speak very fast or very slow or they repeat some syllables or take considerable time to initiate voicing. Such ‘blocks of speech’ are generally referred to by their technical names such as ‘prolongation’, ‘hesitation’, ‘repetition’, ‘substitution’.

There may be diverse underlying causes for stuttering such as psychological, lack of coordination between speaking and hearing, lack of muscular coordination etc. Speech therapists use various techniques to try to correct stuttering or disfluency problems. Broadly the techniques are of two types: (a) make the client speak with a rhythm and (b) to alter the auditory feedback.

The first group- ‘Speaking with a rhythm’ is also useful for clients with ‘hurried speech’.

There is no hard and fast rule as to which of the therapy techniques would help a specific stuttering client. The most suitable technique for a specific client’s condition has to be arrived at by means of trial and error, preferably under the guidance of a qualified professional.

Vagmi Therapy Stuttering Module menus:

 

Speak with a Rhythm

Prolongation

Speaking to Beats

Reading at a Uniform Speed – Word Level

Reading at a Uniform Speed – Sentence Level

Altered Audio Feedback

Delayed Auditory Feedback (also known as DAF)

Suppressing Hearing Feedback

Such as (a) Delayed auditory feedback (known as DAF), (b) Prolongation (c) Speaking with a rhythm (d) Reading at a uniform speed (e) Suppressing hearing feedback by means of noise or music. There is no hard and fast rule as to which of these would help a specific stuttering client. They have to arrive at the most suitable technique for their condition by means of trial and error.